FAQs

*** Check the "Acronym" dictionary for further informational links. ***

What is the Weirton Area Port District?
What is an Inland Port?
What is a Virtual Port?
What is a Logistics Village?
What is TWIC?
What is a Quasi-Public Corporation?
What is a Stakeholder?
What is a Key Stakeholder?
What is a Public-Private Partnership?
What is a U.S. Port of Entry?
How does the Port District's waterway system benefit its communities?
What is the OH River Inland Waterway?
How is an NVOCC different from a Freight Forwarder?


Q: What is the Weirton Area Port District?
A: The Weirton Area Port District 1) includes two WV Northern Panhandle counties, Hancock and Brooke; 2) includes 40 miles of commercially navigable waterways which encompass the new Cumberland Lock and Dam; 3) supports over 80 river terminals and barge industry service suppliers, including privately owned river terminals; and 4) is served by CSX and Norfolk Southern railroads linking river terminals with major state highways that connect to major interstate highways.


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Q: What is an Inland Port?

A: An Inland Port fulfills some of the functions of a deep seaport and may be located either on an inland waterway or a land-locked site, either not being near traditional coastal borders (water, land, air). Inland Ports allow time consuming goods sorting and processing to be done closer to regional distribution centers and away from congested seaports. In addition, they provide value-added services for goods moving through the supply chain and facilitate international trade through investments in multi-modal assets and communications networks.


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Q: What is a Virtual Port?

A: A Virtual Port in not a brick and mortar port. Instead is utilizes the Internet to facilitate regional, domestic and international commerce. It supports import and export opportunities and encourages economic growth and competitiveness by bringing the latest technology to the region, improving the utilization of assets and providing users a single virtual location for all services related to trade, logistics, transportation, security and community resiliency.


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Q: What is a Logistics Village?

A: A Logistics village is an area with the following capabilities - the intersection of two or more transportation modes; interfaces with both local and long-distance traffic; a concentration of logistics (transport, distribution, warehousing) and commercial trade companies; and cooperation between companies for efficiency improvements with the cooperative relationships typically coordinated by an independent development and management company.


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Q: What is TWIC?

A: TWIC is a DHS Transportation Worker Identification Credential administered by the USCG for all personnel requiring unescorted access to secure MTSA-regulated (Maritime Transportation Security Act) areas, facilities and vessels. Individuals meeting DHS TWIC eligibility are issued a tamper-resistant credential containing the worker's biometric (fingerprint template) data to allow for positive link between the card and the individual. See USCG site at www.homeport.uscg.mil for info.


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Q: What is a Quasi-Public Corporation?

A: A Quasi-Public Corporation is a privately operated corporation that fulfills a public mandate and often has governmental backing behind its direct debt obligations. Its structure more easily supports public-private partnerships since it is a private corporation organized and managed as such, thus with the ability to attract private investments. A quasi-public corporation may be a non-profit corporation depending on its corporate charter and services.


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Q: What is a Stakeholder?

A: Stakeholders consist of many individuals and organizations. Stakeholders are all those entities, individuals or organizations, internal or external, that may be impacted by the outcome of the Port's services and projects. These include members, sponsors, project teams, committees, working groups, customers, end users, suppliers and vendors -- anyone in the service food chain.


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Q: What is a Key Stakeholder?

A: A Key Stakeholder is a Stakeholder who, if support was withdrawn, would cause a significant negative impact to a project, potentially resulting in its failure.


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Q: What is a U.S. Port of Entry?

A: A U.S. Port of Entry is any designated place where a U.S. Customs & Border Patrol (CBP) officer is authorized to accept entries of merchandise, collect duties, and enforce the various provisions of the customs and navigation laws (19 CFR 101.1). Port of Entries typically are at deep sea, coastal ports and major international airports; however they may also be located inland at regional Foreign Trade Zones controlled by the CBP and allowed to accept and process imported merchandise and produce.


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Q: How does the Port District's waterway system benefit its communities?

A: Studies estimate that more than 13,000 kilo tons of goofs move along the Port District's waterways and that 2,000 jobs are dependent upon the waterway transportation system. Inland waterway transportation is generally the least costly transportation mode. Average costs range between $0.005 and $0.01 per ton-mile of cargo moved compared to nearly $0.05 for tail and $0.10 for truck.


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Q: What is the OH River Inland Waterway?

A: The Ohio River region, part of the US inland waterways, significantly contributed to the growth & prosperity of the US. For centuries settlers in the upper Ohio River basin used the system of rivers in the Weirton area to expand commerce & industrial enterprise. In 1824 Congress tasked the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers with improving navigation on the Ohio River. In 1885, the first Ohio River lock and dam was dedicated. Over a 44 year period a total of 53 locks and dams were built on the Ohio River system from Pittsburgh, PA to Cairo, IL.


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Q: What is a Public-Private Partnership?

A: A Public-Private Partnership is a contractual agreement between a public entity (federal, state, local) and private sector entity/ies through which skills and assets of each sector are shared in delivering services/facilities for general public use. In addition to the sharing of resources, each party shares the risks and rewards in the delivery of the services and/or facility.  (www.NCPPP.org)


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Q: How is an NVOCC different from a Freight Forwarder?

A: NVOCC = N on-Vessel Operating Common Carrier is ALMOST the same as a Freight Forwarder in terms of its activities.. However there are some differences which separate the two entities. Apart from the four major differences below, all other activities between the two entities are similar to each other. The NVOCC is basically a "carrier to shippers" and a "shipper to carriers".
- The NVOCC can, and sometimes does, own and operate its own or leased containers whereas a Freight Forwarder does not.
- In certain countries like USA, the NVOCC operators are required to file for tariffs with the government regulatory bodies and create a public tariff.
- The NVOCC is, in certain areas, accorded the status of a virtual “carrier” and in certain cases accepts all liabilities of a carrier.
- A Freight Forwarding company can act as an agent/partner for the NVOCC.


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Last Updated: 09/12/2014 05:00:00 AM